Select a page below

Parquet
Marquetry
Strips
Boards
Woodblocks
Engineered
Panels
Borders
Timbers
Lacquers
Technical
Underfloor Heating
Price Lists
David Gunton's Hardwood Floors.
Grange Lane, Winsford,
Cheshire, CW7 2PS
Tel: +44 (0)1606 861 442
Fax: +44 (0)1606 861 445
wideboards@gmail.com

Herringbone Parquets

Go back to home page.

Blocks for making herringbone patterns are available as ex-stock ready manufactured products in several qualities of Oak and also in Ash, Beech, Iroko, Maple, Merbau and Zimbabwe Teak. We are not yet showing photographs of laid areas in every species.

Single Medium Dimension Herringbone

Herringbone is perhaps the most traditional pattern in the UK. In France the call it 'Parquet des Anglais'. Though it is not uncommon it need not look commonplace. There are batten sizes available from as small as 100mm x 30mm to almost as large as you like. The pattern can be made in almost any timber. There are double and triple herringbone patterns. The pattern relies upon the light reflecting off the alternate rows at different angles, thus presenting the rows as alternately light and dark.

To the right is a photograph of a new oak herringbone floor. These battens are 350mm x 70mm. they are made of French Oak cut 'quatier faux quatier' - quarter sawn and near quarter sawn.

This is a detail of the simple border around this floor. Many more styles of borders may be used to enhance a simple or complex design,

This border is in American Black Walnut, juglans negra.The border 'frames' the floor nicely and can be used to reduce the visual impact of the many minor interruptions in the line of a wall such as support pillars, built in furniture and radiator casings.

 


The rows of blocks alternate, light and dark. This effect is the result of the light being reflected at differing intensities according to the direction of the run of the grain in each row. Once, David was called by a customer who complained that the craftsmen had sorted all the blocks out into alternate rows of light and dark timber. It took a considerable amount of persuasion and demonstration for her to accept that this was the natural and desired effect of laying in herringbone pattern and that the blocks are not sorted into light and dark shades for each row. She remained sceptical and suspicious that she had been conned by a smooth talking liar!



This is a detail of a border set around a new fireplace opening. The lines of the mitres do not run directly to the skirting corners because a false wall is to be built to enable the accommodation of a plasma screen, sound systems and cabling. In fact the border had to remade because the joinery company which provided the setting out made a mistake and failed to allow enough space for the repositioning of the marble hearth.

Go back to home page.